Emergency dentist lindfield

Dental Emergency Definition

According to the Dental Association, dental emergencies are potentially life-threatening situations that require immediate treatment to stop ongoing tissue bleeding and/or alleviate severe pain or infection.

The above definition for dental emergency covers the most extreme cases. There are also less severe cases such as broken teeth or general toothache. Below we have listed some of the most frequent dental emergencies.

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Common Dental Emergencies

Toothache 

Tooth pain can be attributed to many different causes some of which can be serious. Therefore, if one of your teeth is hurting, contact us to book an emergency appointment as soon as possible.

In the meantime, rinse the mouth with warm water. Use a cold compress to lessen your pain. Do not use a hot compress as it will make things worse. Do not put aspirin on your tooth.

Chipped Tooth 

In most cases, teeth with small chips can be saved. As long as you visit the dentist soon after you have a broken or damaged tooth, he or she can assess the situation and provide the required dental treatment to save or restore your tooth to its previous shape and form. Try not to use that tooth for chewing until your dentist has seen it and treated it.

Broken Tooth 

If your tooth is badly cracked or broken, it might require additional treatment to save or restore it. If the breakage is below your gum, the chance of saving that tooth is reduced. Depending on the severity of your broken tooth, you might require a root canal. The best course of action is to book an appointment at an emergency dental clinic and minimize the use of your teeth until a dentist sees you.

Knocked-Out Tooth 

Every year there are many cases of teeth being knocked out due to force of trauma or accident. If your tooth is knocked out, it does not mean that it is lost. There is hope, but you have to act quickly.

First, make sure to pick up the tooth by the crown and not the root. If dirty, clean it using saline. Next, place the tooth back in its socket if it is possible. Hold it in place by biting down.

If you cannot put the tooth back in its socket, then make sure to place it in milk and see an emergency dentist within 30 minutes of the injury.

Bitten Lip or Tongue 

Generally, biting into your lip or tongue causes a small bruise that will heal itself in a day or two. However, in some instances, it might be more severe and result in a deep cut. Suppose the bitten lip or tongue is causing you significant discomfort, and the bleeding is not stopping. In that case, you should visit the ER (Emergency Room at a local hospital) or contact your emergency dentist for an immediate appointment.

You can treat the bitten lip by rinsing the area with warm water and applying a cold compress. To stop the bleeding put pressure on the bitten area using a clean cloth or gauze.

Lost Filling 

Dental fillings can last from 5 to 15 years, depending on their material and how well they are placed. Therefore, it is common for a filling to come out of its place. If your dental filling has been lost or came off, visit your dentist as soon as possible to have it examined and repaired.

You can place a sugarless gum in the place where the filling used to be until your dentist sees you.